January Newsletter – Winter Styling

Isn’t it funny and sad that year after year, every time you take down your holiday decor it creates a sense of emptiness in your home that wasn’t there in November? The excess of “stuff” that we love in December makes for a seemingly lonely January. Pair freshly sparse interiors with grey weather and it is no wonder people tend to wish winter away.

That being said, let us offer you an alternative outlook. Conjure up the beauty of simplicity. Imagine serene, quiet, peaceful interiors where every accessory, every accent, is deliberate, intelligent, and purposeful. January is an excellent month to strip down your decor and redefine purpose within spaces. Start fresh. De-clutter. Keep what you love, let go of what can be forgotten, and open yourself to new design directions and experiences. There is something cathartic and regenerating about letting go of the holidays and the confines of last year.

Here’s to creating space for 2017. Happy New Year!

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Featured BHD Space: Winter Styling 

Clean off your surfaces and go simple this season. Don’t be surprised if a vase with fresh flowers is all you need to brighten your space and set the tone for a peaceful new year.

Here, the simple pop of yellow picks up the warm accents in the painting. Intentional without seemingly overly done. 

Here, the simple pop of yellow picks up the warm accents in the painting. Intentional without seemingly overly done. 

Grey walls, white built ins, white appliances, and a few buds are all you need to make this space come alive. Beauty in simplicity and softness in color.

With good bones – in this case, good vanity, countertop, back splash, faucets, mirrors, and lighting- all you need is a vase of flowers to pull it all together. We chose a darker, linear fuchsia flower to balance the boldness of its counterparts and follow the vertical lines of the lighting. 

Monochrome metallic accessories add a nice sheen during the dark winter months. This simple collection is all you need to warm up a space. 

We love how the white porcelain shines against the dark beadboard and oil-rubbed bronze faucet. The pink zinnias set in an antique pitcher are all this space needs to make it feel complete. 

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Featured Event: Carlyle Wolfe at David Lusk Gallery

Don’t miss the ethereal beauty of Carlyle Wolfe’s paintings at David Lusk Gallery.  We love how the paintings capture the stillness and tranquility of nature. Let the show be inspiration for your interiors. Before you go, check out the painters website and Instagram, both are truly beautiful and provide great context for the artist’s work. 

WHEN: January 3 – February 4th, Tuesday – Saturday 11am – 5pmWHERE:  David Lusk Gallery, 516 Hagan Street, Nashville 

Click here for more info

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Featured Event: Antique and Garden Show

Though this event isn’t till next month, we wanted to remind everyone to take a peek at the list of special events / lectures early because these events tend to sell out. This year, the caliber of speakers is remarkable and really worth checking out! We highly recommend Every Home Tells A Story featuring mega-star designer Nate Berkus and Creating Patina Farm with designers Brooke & Steve Giannetti Friday. Nashville’s Antiques and Garden Show gets the best speakers!

LECTURES: February 3, 11am Nate Berkus, February 3, 2pm Brooke & Steve Giannetti

SHOW RUN: February 3 – 5: Friday & Saturday 10am – 7pm, Sunday 11am – 4pm

WHERE:  Music City Center, 201 Fifth Avenue South, Nashville

Click here for more info

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Hot Topic: Ojai California & Patina Farm

Nestled in the mountains between Santa Barbara and Malibu, Ojai California has long been our list of places we most want to visit. Over the last few years, the design aesthetic in this charmingly laid back, mountain town has emerged into a very polished, rough-lux vibe we want to experience in person.

Luckily, the Antique and Garden Show is bringing in two of Ojai’s top designers, Brooke and Steve Giannetti, as part of their lecture series. Hopefully, the discussion will give us insight into the way interior design combines with the magnificient rustic beauty of the natural surroundings. Just one look at their majestic tree featured out the kitchen window at Patina Farm has us on the edge of our seat! We were so impressed with the homes featured on the Dwell on Design LA home tour last spring and we can’t wait to see more California indoor-outdoor spaces and the sustainable design approaches that are seamlessly incorporated into everyday living. 

Click here for the designer’s website and more images from Patina Farm

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Trend Alert – Mid Century Modern

Trend Alert – Mid Century Modern design is having a major moment. Our phones keep ringing with potential clients asking for MCM. We’ve done renovations to restore MCM homes to their former glory and we’ve infused countless homes with MCM accent pieces and decor. It is funny because baby boomers that grew up with MCM once tended to steer away from the look since it probably reminded them of their parents’ house but like many things, MCM came full circle.

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Mid Century Modern was a design era from the 1930’s to the 1960’s. Started by the Bauhaus, an art school in Germany, MCM stems from the idea that everything can be designed. The Bauhaus believed architecture should encompass more than the exterior shell of a building and interior walls, it should include the furnishings, finishes, and decor. Bauhaus saw every object as an “art object”. Bauhaus took this idea and applied it to all aspects of design, including graphic design, industrial design, and interior design.

Beyond Bauhaus, MCM gained traction in America and other parts of the world like Brazil and Scandinavia. American designers are often credited with infusing the strong linear lines of the Bauhaus MCM with a slightly softer, more organic structures. Many of the most iconic furniture still in use today was designed during the MCM era. Undulating forms, curved arms, tapered “peg legs“, and an assortment of woods like teak, walnut, maple, and beech are some of the defining characteristics of MCM design. 

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BHD has long been a fan of MCM. From a design standpoint, MCM is a designer’s secret weapon because the pieces add character and help create a layered look when paired with more contemporary furniture. We love the scale of MCM furniture because it isn’t the puffed-up furniture we tend to see today and is really great for historic homes that tend to have less square footage. Lastly, we love MCM furniture because it is the perfect blend of organic, natural materials and high-design. 

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The great thing about buying MCM furniture today is you have the option to buy new or you can buy used. There are a plethora of design firms recreating classic MCM looks, from walnut credenzas to sling back chairs, that are priced well and give you the look without the hunt. Buying authentic MCM can be tricky but we love tracking down originals because we love their originality and quality. There are local Nashville dealers that specialize in authentic MCM and tons of online sites. It is getting rarer and rarer to find MCM priced cheap at antique stores, estate sales, and thrift stores but there are definitely still deals to be found! 

This BHD space is featured on HGTV’s article on MCM design!

MCM art is another one of our favorite go-tos. We love the organic muted tones and geometrically driven designs. We often have better luck finding MCM art in local thrift stores and the like because it isn’t as recognizable as say an Eames lounge chair or a Saarinen tulip table. 

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An easy and relatively inexpensive way to add MCM appeal to your home is through color, either with paint or textiles. Color wise, small accents of citruses or mustards go a long way. Sherwin Williams  “Vintage Finds” is a good starting point. BHD literally has hundreds of color options to choose from! We love layered accent textiles in a space to build a bohemian, eclectic look.

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Kahnle Kitchen

We’ve been excited to share this project for months and are thrilled the time is finally right. Not only has this project won GOLD from American Society of Interior Designers “Best Small Kitchen”, it’s the home of one of our favorite clients.

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Allow us to introduce to you Mike Kahnle.  Mike’s story doesn’t begin when his wife Hilary was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2010 but is is where we are going to start. Three kids, happy household, uprooted by a terminal disease. From her diagnosis to her street fight with cancer, to Hilary’s passing in August 2012, to the very present moment, Mike’s life has been changing. He quickly realized normal was not his going to be his family’s reality.

Mike knows firsthand the titles we all use to define ourselves rarely show the whole picture. Father, landscape architect, designer, artist; all true but in real life, what matters is now is how the pieces interplay. How do you raise three young daughters on your own?  Easy, stand up and confront it!  His new label will be feminist dad!  He will teach his daughters independence and artistry and kindness and joy and laughter.  He will now seek out and support women-owned business in the hope of knocking down the barriers that might stand in the way of his daughters.  He will lead them by example, showing them how to solve problems creatively.  He will teach them to treat people and the planet with kindness.  He will encourage them to start their life’s work today.  He will be a feminist dad!

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Good Grief

Before Hilary passed away, a giant red oak tree fell down in their backyard during a tremendous windstorm. Mike suddenly realized that he wanted to use the tree to make something useful.  A tree falls down but its life isn’t over. Using Hilary’s grandfather’s ax and then a two-handed draw knife for fine carving, Mike cut deeper into the log revealing the grain. “As more and more wood is removed, an intricate pattern of light and dark band reveal the tree’s growth cycle over the years; periods of great growth and periods of drought—not only how old the tree lived to be, but also how the tree lived over its lifetime.’ The sculptures, labeled “Good Grief” have become an expression of Mike’s grief, an expression of losing his wife. Each piece is a part of Mike’s story.image003

Creative Problem Solving

Another piece of the story is the family’s kitchen. Hilary, a talented architect, and Mike liked to muse renovations. Completed in 2015, the kitchen has become “a symbol of the family healing, a decision to move forward with life, and to accept that Hilary’s last wish was for us all to be happy and to grow in her absence”.  Mike chose Beth Haley Design to design a space that fit the family’s new reality – life without Mom – while keeping with the decidedly mid-century spirit of the house and honoring Hilary’s wishes.  A tall order, which came together brilliantly and the long term impact of the renovations have been profound.  The family kitchen in now a gathering spot. It’s a pace to convene and converse.  The transformation from pre-renovation dysfunction to post renovation function can’t be understated.  The experience formed Mike’s developing world view that the basis of design is creative problem solving.

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Taking cues from the existing architecture of the space, our design challenge was to maintain the vintage, 1960’s feel of the home while maximizing function in the existing kitchen. We worked to create layers of visual interest and add to the homes appeal and design.  We brought natural light into the centrally located kitchen by installing a tunnel skylight in the center of the space. Recessed lighting, pendants, and under cabinet lighting work in unison to further illuminate the space.  In addition, we removed a load bearing wall and replaced with an architectural support beam-decked out in red paint-to further open up the space and bring in more natural light.

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To create a sense of openness in the kitchen, we chose to feature doorless cabinets and colorful shelving that reflect the 60’s feel and personality of the home.

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Within the existing layout, the sink wall opening was enlarged and encased in wood paneling on both sides, both facing the kitchen and facing into the other living spaces. The wood paneling creates a very unique, custom look, making the kitchen appear like an exotic, high performing piece of furniture or appliance when viewed from other angles around the home.   The waterfall edge countertop by the cooktop and new eat-in peninsula expand the visual space and are purposely paired with backless barstools that leave the sightline into the space uninterrupted. Hardwood floors were selected to make the kitchen feel more congruent with the adjoining rooms.

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The Saarinen table and Bertoia chairs work perfectly with the period furniture found throughout the house. Accents of red standout against the white and natural wood backdrop.

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Much of the existing layout remained but the addition of a beverage, snack, and lunch station was developed to complete the space. High-function was the aim when we designed this stretch of cabinets with a base with microwave for the kids, pull-out pantry, and lots of drawers for storage. Though it is a short expanse of wall, it is a hub of activity with maxed out functionality.
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Like most kitchens, it is the hub of the house for the active and fully engaged family. This kitchen, more than any we have ever worked on, is the heart of the home. Connection being the key both in terms of space and in terms of relationships. Mike’s life is full of creativity, sensitivity, and passion.  We are honored to share his story with you. Mike is a local designer and landscape architect. We encourage all of you to check out his website and see his work. In addition, we are honored to have some of Mike’s pieces installed in our lawn. If you haven’t been by our shop on Linden recently, come by, say hi, and take a look at the art!