In our March newsletter we promised to address some of the most common design blunders, misconceptions, and hang-ups. It wasn’t hard to come up with a list of ideas but rather hard to narrow it down! Turns out, clients time and again have a hard time picking, choosing, and using color and prints in their home. Often you see our before photos are either white rooms with minimal color and print or too much print. For now, let’s focus on color!

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A neutral background allows purple to sing!

Color Psychology 101

Everyone has heard red makes you angry and blue calms you down but there is a lot more too it. The primary colors red, yellow, and blue are seldomly used in their purest form. Primary red can be perceived as aggressive, primary blue is the calmest of the three colors, and primary yellow really is the color of energy.

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This is red but not primary red. We love it!

Color Mixing 101

Often, we need the secondary colors orange, green, and violet to create the six tertiary colors (colors created when combining  primary and secondary colors) that are most often used in interior design. From there, we need white and black to tint, tone, or shade. White tints, black and white together tone, and black shades.

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Shades and tones of blue and green work really well in this vibrant, peaceful dining room!

Interior design is all about mixing color and creating color schemes. Designers know what colors are considered “classically complementary”, as in opposite on the color wheel but also have a deep, instinctual feel for what color combinations will work in a space.

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Orange, red, green, and blue? Just the right mix in this eclectic space!

We love creating monochromatic rooms with small bursts of color. The idea is a hallmark, fundamental element of design. Many sleek rooms are built from a single color and accentuated through accessories, art, and special fabrics.

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Bathrooms are a great space for a monochromatic look and a single, shining color. Here we have a crisp white bathroom paired with nice bluish greens. It is a timeless look.

Another thing to consider is how spaces flow with one another. You can be bold and have one red room, one blue room, and so forth but often we find it is best to create a general color story for your house. Most homes we see (or design!) are open floor plan. It is generally best to consider the house as a whole rather than in segments.

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Expertly matched blues work well with hints of yellow and many metallic accent pieces. The space was designed to pair with the adjacent dining room but also have a distinct style of its own.

Mixing bold colors can be daunting but pulling it off can have big design impact. The key is to let each bold color balance the other. Scale and furniture placement are important to consider as they will shape the way the color is perceived!

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Fuchsia paired with teal and a yellow make for a very interesting color story! The secret to this working is all three are complementary colors and the scale is just right.

Lastly, never underestimate the power of art in interior design. Sometimes it is best to simply create an environment for the canvases to take center stage.

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The art demands attention on it’s own but the design elevates it to front and center. By placing the canvas on in a space with neutral walls, floors, and keeping the furniture minimal and modern, the art is thrusted to the forefront.

Stay tuned to next week when we get into Ides of design, prints addition!